November Projects

SOME ROOMS

Sunday 3rd November starts: 12 – 4.30pm
Marrickville Garage will be open only on the 3rd November Sunday 12-4.30 pm, followed by closing bbq and drinks.

some rooms

some rooms

Participants: Cherine Fahd: storeroom; Jürgen Kerkovius: main bedroom; Danica Knezevic: spare-bedroom; Margaret Mayhew: kitchen; Sarah Newall: lounge; Mark Shorter: office; Mark Titmarsh: garage; Sean Lowry: garage toilet; Sara Givins: garage door

Before there was Marrickville Garage, Sarah Newall had the idea to have a one-off show using the rooms of the house as alternative exhibition spaces. This was inspired by Lisa Andrew and Bronia Iwanczak’s Appin Motel project “The Appin Labyrinth” in which they rented 13 motel rooms for artists to use in some way for a couple of hours. These temporary ventures inside ad-hoc rooms that operated as ready-made installations, were a long way from the white cube. The dire atmosphere of the Appin Motel became a part of the art particularly in Mark Shorter’s haunted room, Sarah Goffman’s meth lab and Jane Polkinghorne’s public toilet. For “Some Rooms” (an overt play on the 2013 Kaldor Projects “13 Rooms”) artists will perform in various rooms of the house for the duration of the show.

Sarah Newall

Camouflage-(Listening-Piece)web

Camouflage-(Listening-Piece)

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Camouflage (listening piece) (detail) 2013
Cherine Fahd

In Camouflage (listening piece),  the action of listening is heightened by hiding every part of the face and body except the ear. The ear remains exposed as an offering to the audience. The audience is invited to tell the ear something by whispering. The performance enacts the secrecy of a whisper; as the artist remains clandestine, hidden by fabric, so too does the whisperer who cannot be seen by the artist.

Terror Australis: time well spent

Terror Australis: time well spent

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Terror Australis: time well spent
Jürgen Kerkovius

I am constructing a topography of digital motion by drawing a projected image of a moth circulating a beam of light. Through this act, the corporeal presence of my body engages with the screen, as I slowly capture the moth’s movements within a single yet fragmented frame.

Dance with me

Dance with me

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I keep dancing on my own
Danica Knezevic

This live performance is an extension of the installation Dance with me. Both works examine the nuance and subtleties of gender, sexuality and identity: self and other.  The set up of the video was to create a space that is open for expression and exploration of the self. We all move to a beat, whether it is to the music or our own sound. Others mirror this experience when they interact with that movement and are within our space. The performance situated within the bedroom further highlights the longing for another’s reflection. The person dancing is internally perpetuating their idea of self within an intimate setting, longing for an other to connect with them. The projection and reflection are inextricably linked: one cannot exist without the other. The viewer’s reflection is offered to connect with mine.

Nanna-Madge

Nanna-Madge

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Nanna Madge’s Mean Cuisine
Margaret Mayhew

Nanna’s deepest love is of cooking and preparing traditional bowling club fare, to be shared with friends and family alike. During Some Rooms, she will be cooking up a storm, ensuring that each visitor can have a delightful time enjoying traditional home cooked Aussie Buffet.
She can work wonders with a bench-top, a stack of doiles, some glad wrap and an electric knife, but is happy to incorporate any Tupperware into her arrangements.
Nanna Madge is a sensualist, and it is not improbable that after a few sherries she may kick up her heels and get a bit down and dirty with a saveloy or two. Despite a few close shaves, Nanna’s experimentation is all part of the good healthy fun that is part of the Aussie spirit for which Nanna Madge is renowned.

nintendo

Nintendo

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Nintendo 64 (detail) 2013
Sarah Newall

It is viciously simply we play – we lose and we play again. The game itself can be played until the skills are mastered to enable the player to move up through the levels. Some games cannot be beaten. Tetris, created by Soviet mathematician, Alexei Pajitnov, is one such game. The blocks rain down in eight different configurations that must be rotated to fit together. If you achieve a complete line it vanishes to give you more room on the board. The tiles pour down faster and faster, giving an ever-decreasing amount of time, until it becomes impossible to master. In these old video games you know you can never win, but you continue to play, engaged in a purely symbolic struggle. But still, you play again. Maybe this time you will do a little bit better.[1]


[1] S Poole, Trigger Happy: Videogames and the entertainment revolution, Arcade Publishing: New York, 2000, p. 43.

Untold-Torments_Without-Reason

Untold-Torments_Without-Reason

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Untold Torments Without Reason (2013)
Mark Shorter 

In January 2013, I spent three weeks criss-crossing the Manchegan Plains in Southern Spain; the country made famous by Miguel de Cervantes’ novel, Don Quixote (1605, 1611). I was interested in considering the idea that Quixote expresses a culture in crisis, reflecting a Europe in transition between its medieval past and its enlightened future. In Untold Torments I wanted to return to this ambivalent space. I wanted to document it, perform in it and ultimately consider the idea that La Mancha will forever be a place of transition, emptiness and madness. and you play again.

Silly String
Silly String

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(Silly) String Theory 2,
(detail) 2008, production still, photo Reina Tamagaki
Mark Titmarsh

(Silly) String Theory 2 in the context of Marrickville Garage, becomes a theory of coherence around the presence and performance of colour. Colour embedded in plastic, extends the family of colour from paint, through Perspex, acrylic glass, acrylic mirror, silly string, and so on through the entire industrial polymer complex.

The absencing of painting, the thing which is conspicuously absent, is joined by the plastic presencing of colour. Painting and the plasticity of colour are entwined with each other, co-producing and co-defining each other, existing only by virtue of their differential relationship.  As such painting is harboured and contextualised by the colours of industrial plastics, and the plasticity of colour is framed and given meaning by its relation to painting.

In this reversal of the spatio-temporal aspects of colour the artist becomes the dynamic surface on which the event of colour takes place, rather than the subjective director of paint onto an inert and receptive substrate.

Gallery Door

Windows
Windows

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Sara Givins
Envelope
Envelope
is an invitation to go positively postal. Peel back the layers and slide through to the other side.

Toilet Door

Sean Lowry

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Back Wall of House

William Nicholson, An Alphabet, 1897

William Nicholson, An Alphabet, 1897

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Lisa Andrew
Image: William Nicholson, An Alphabet, 1897

W is for wailing
Inkjet on polyester

 

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